Posts Tagged ‘Road shows’

‘Key to success … is preparation’

June 2, 2014

AlaixJuan Ramón Alaix, CEO of the animal health giant Zoetis Inc. (formerly Pfizer Animal Health, spun off as a NYSE-listed company last year), offers wise counsel on communicating effectively with investors.

In a “How I Did It” CEO interview in the June 2014 issue of Harvard Business Review, Mr. Alaix comments:

A lot of people, when they reach a certain age, are reluctant to accept training. That’s not true for me—I’m very open to it. I’d had communication training over my career, but the preparation for our IPO was much more intensive. Before I did my first TV interview, for instance, I probably spent more than eight hours doing mock interviews. I believe that the key to success in communication is preparation. By the time I gave the first road-show pitch to investors, I’d rehearsed it at least 40 times.

Wonderful words from a CEO! As IR professionals, most of us have had the opposite experience: an exec who is too busy to practice and thinks it’s OK to wing it because, after all, who knows the story better?

Ask the people who listen to investor presentations: The CEO, CFO or IRO who is practiced and prepared will always have a greater impact than the one who fumbles with his thoughts – or just reads the script.

It’s good to hear Mr. Alaix endorse the most basic rule of speech making: rehearse, rehearse, rehearse! I’m sure Zoetis is well-served in its communications – and other areas – by this kind of diligence.

© 2014 Johnson Strategic Communications Inc.

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It’s the CEO

January 31, 2014

When it comes to interacting with the investment community, Numero Uno is still No. 1. According to a global survey of more than 1,200 investor relations officers by IR Magazine, nearly two out of three IROs (64%) say the Chief Executive Officer is more important than the Chief Financial Officer in relationships with investors.

At least in terms of CEOs’ primary role in investor relations, customs aren’t that different around the globe, according to a story in IR Magazine‘s December 2013-January 2014 issue.

Among small-cap companies, even more IROs (76%) say the CEO is preferred over the finance chief by investors seeking access, while 61% of mid-cap and 59% of mega-cap IROs agree.

According to one European small-cap IRO quoted in the survey:

Investors want to believe in the vision, not in the quarterly figures.

I’ve seen it both ways: companies whose CEOs “own” the story and are the best salespeople for it, and others whose investors would rather talk with the CFO while the CEO stays home to run the business. What’s your experience?

© 2014 Johnson Strategic Communications Inc.