Posts Tagged ‘NIRI’

Steady as she goes, IROs

August 16, 2011

A quote of the day for investor relations professionals, from National Investor Relations Institute President and CEO Jeff Morgan in his “IR Weekly” email and blog post under the heading “Market Mayhem”:

Market volatility reached new extremes last week as we experienced global market moves of positive to negative 5% from one day to the next. Most believe it is very unlikely these market moves were driven by fundamental analysis of companies, but instead by panic, margin calls and computerized trading. For IROs, these are the most challenging market conditions as they lack logic and rational explanation. Time and other actions outside our influence and control will bring markets back into check, as we continue to tell our story to investors.

I agree, although market mayhem may be more rational than we can see at the moment. However much we dislike “panic,” if the market performs horribly going forward, fear will seem logical in retrospect. Time will tell whether investors should “Hang on and weather the storm” or “Batten down the hatches and go to cash.”

Certainly for IR professionals, whose individual companies may be doing fine even as the market goes crazy, it’s sound advice to hold the wheel … steady as she goes.

© 2011 Johnson Strategic Communications Inc.

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Watching Washington

September 29, 2009

All eyes are on Washington this fall, as the country watches hope and change take hold through new laws and regulations. When NIRI President and CEO Jeff Morgan briefed a group of investor relations people and corporate lawyers in Kansas City on changes coming our way from DC, “scary” was a word that kept recurring.

Jeff Morgan 9-29-09“There are a lot of scary things happening in Washington, and some potentially good things happening in Washington,” Morgan said Tuesday evening at the NIRI Kansas City chapter meeting.

Motivated by the financial crisis, Morgan noted, politicians have turned from talk to action on regulatory issues that have been around for years. Rightly or wrongly, he added, politicians see only two causes for the financial crisis: corporate greed and lack of adequate regulation. So they are bent on fixing those problems.

Morgan said significant changes in the way corporations are governed are in the works in Congress and at the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC):

  • “Say on pay” proxy votes and input from a federal “pay czar,” initially targeting financial companies that got bailouts, could be expanded by Congress to all public companies.
  • If say on pay spreads, institutional investors – many of whom lack the staff to examine every executive pay proposal – would outsource the research and perhaps the voting to RiskMetrics Group. RiskMetrics sells governance advice to companies, and chastises those who don’t measure up to its standards.
  • An SEC proxy access proposal to expand shareholders’ ability to nominate board members seems likely to take effect, and Congress could weigh in to expand the mandates. That would empower activist investors such as union pension funds to target companies for changes in governance.
  • An SEC change in Rule 452 to eliminate broker discretionary voting, starting January 2010, seems likely to disrupt voting of retail stockholders’ share.
  • Various proposals are kicking around Congress on board compensation committees, separating the CEO and chairman roles, requiring certification and training for directors, eliminating staggered boards and other issues.

What can companies do? Get senior management to reach out to Congress with the public-company viewpoint on proposals for federal intervention. Take pre-emptive action by implementing compensation and proxy access programs designed to enhance, rather than put a strangle hold on, good governance for companies.

Two good sources on legislative and regulatory changes are Jeff Morgan’s blog on NIRI.org and Broc Romanek’s blog at TheCorporateCounsel.net.

We’d better be watching Washington. Says Morgan: “Corporations are the lifeblood of America, and we’re doing things that are dangerous to those corporations.”