What’s material? It depends …

Materiality is one of those fuzzy ideas. Is it a piece of information that makes your stock price move (or would if disclosed)? A change that impacts sales or profit by 10% … or 5 … or 1? One of those events requiring an 8-K filing? Is anything investors want to know material?

Early in my career in investor relations, I learned that accountants can be surprisingly philosophical – arguing vehemently when gathered around a table for late-night discussion of a draft. The same is true of lawyers. And I suppose IROs can disagree on such issues, too.

The Wall Street Journal offered up a couple of explorations this week:

In “Definition of Materiality Depends Who You Ask” on Nov. 3, the quicker read, a WSJ blogger quotes five different definitions of materiality – such as they are – and notes that they are in flux.

In “Firms, Regulators Try to Sort Out What’s Worth Disclosing to Investors” on Nov. 2, the paper focuses on potential shifts in regulatory views – and pushback from companies against overlegislation.

This debate is perennial, and probably unresolvable. But a refreshing aspect is the new interest in whether companies are disclosing too much detail that has nothing to do with investors making decisions – and by its sheer volume may obscure what the real issues are.

Honeywell International Inc., the paper notes, is pursuing on a “disclosure simplification” project to enhance the quality of reporting. In October, Honeywell and its CPAs met with the SEC staff – and the agency filed a short Honeywell slide deck outlining key themes:

  • Eliminate duplicative and immaterial disclosures
  • Customize disclosures to Honeywell
  • Streamline footnotes to address information overload
  • Assess the relevance of recurring disclosures
  • Challenge boilerplate language typically included in company filings
  • Use of cross references

Hmmm … novel ideas. Reducing repetition, making footnotes digestible, taking a red pen to boilerplate and questioning verbiage that’s been in the 10-K so long no one can remember why. This will be interesting.

And what do you think “material” means?

© 2015 Johnson Strategic Communications Inc.

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One Response to “What’s material? It depends …”

  1. James McRitchie Says:

    I think some of this will sort out when the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB) develops and disseminates more uniform sustainability accounting standards by industry that help will help public corporations disclose material, decision-useful information to investors.

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