Archive for November, 2013

Memorable statements

November 16, 2013

Like many who were blessed to work in the robust culture that entrepreneur Ewing Kauffman built in a pharmaceutical company once called Marion Laboratories, I benefited from two core values: First, treat others as you would want to be treated, and, second, share the rewards of performance with those who contribute.

Eighteen years later, these simple rules still roll off my tongue easily. This came to mind recently when talking with a client who recited the mission of one of her former employers, in similar fashion – one, two.

Memorable. Brief. Simple.

These qualities, surely, are what make a great corporate mission, value statement or brand. So ad jingles and rhymes about cereals and sodas echo around in our heads decades later. We remember the guiding principles of our long-past employers. Colors and shapes call to our minds names of companies: Coca-Cola, Dow, BP.

And how about investor relations?

Do we give the market memorable, brief and simple messages?

Or do we describe our companies as a complicated matrix of market segments and product categories? A “portfolio” of services and technologies? A graphic collection of boxes crisscrossed with arrows?

And our business strategies: 18 points? Four categories with multiple strategies for each? Changing formulations quarter by quarter?

We should try to boil our companies down to a corporate brand – a few words that are memorable, brief and simple. A reason to invest. Can we capture the essence in two points, or one? A half-dozen words?

© 2013 Johnson Strategic Communications Inc.

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Is ‘guidance’ all there is?

November 13, 2013

Providing financial guidance has become so common – NIRI says 76% of public companies offer forward-looking financial guidance – that investor relations professionals don’t stop to think much about it. But an investment banker in the pharmaceutical industry notes increasing frustration with investors and analysts who obsess on guidance.

In a piece called “The Tyranny of ‘Guidance’,” Michael Martorelli of Fairmount Partners tells readers of Contract Pharma that he’s hearing more questions on conference calls seeking clarification or expansion specifically on management’s guidance for near-term financial results – as opposed to penetrating questions seeking insight into fundamentals or trends:

If you thought all analysts developed their own estimates for the revenue and earnings paths of the companies they follow, welcome to the post Sarbanes-Oxley world of Wall Street research.

Before Sarbanes-Oxley, Martorelli notes, sell-side analysts were committed to building in-depth knowledge of  companies and industries. Investors and corporate managements came to respect the best analysts, and the work of analysis was highly valued.

Post-Sarbanes, of course, the mandate to give the same information to everyone at the same time often takes the form of guidance. And market participants, Martorelli says, can put too much value in near-term numbers. They’ll ask, “Why didn’t you raise your guidance this quarter? Why is the range of your guidance so wide? Why did you lower (or raise) only the top (or bottom) end of your guidance?”

When evaluating the future financial results of a company … too many investors rely more on management’s guidance than on their own independent analysis of the company, the industry, and the trends.

The legal structure is what it is, but companies can perhaps affect the tone of the conversation by focusing what we talk about on the fundamentals … what is really changing in our businesses, growth drivers, challenges and the strategies our companies are executing. After all, we really outperform not so much by beating “guidance” as by beating the competition to create real value for shareholders. It’s the big picture, not the pennies for next quarter.

What’s your take on guidance? Has it taken over the conversation?

© 2013 Johnson Strategic Communications Inc.

Twitter IR could be interesting

November 8, 2013

TWTR NYSEA few years ago an investor relations colleague told me Twitter was “the end of the world as we know it.” Bothered by the cacophony of 140-character mini-messages, this Old Schooler was offended by the damage that tweeting could inflict on our language. To me, it looked interesting rather than scary.

And now Twitter, Inc., after a hugely successful IPO on Thursday that raised roughly $2 billion (which The New York Times DealBook blog sniffed was “more modest” than what the company might have gotten if pricing had been higher), is going to be even more interesting for IR people to watch.

The social media platform has begun life as a public company pledging to talk to investors through – well, social media. To be sure, there is a Twitter investor relations webpage, though I found the corporate site only after some searching. The IR page itself is worth checking out, a bit unconventional with its news from the company blog of mostly non-investor related happenings, a page of financial releases (“Coming soon” … like the earnings, a cynic would say) and, of course, a feed from @twitter.

But this will be worth following. In rolling out Twitter’s stock offering, management pledged to practice its own preaching – using online postings and social media (its own) to get the word out. From the TWTR prospectus:

Channels for Disclosure of Information

Investors, the media and others should note that, following the completion of this offering, we intend to announce material information to the public through filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, or the SEC, our corporate blog at blog.twitter.com, the investor relations page on our website, press releases, public conference calls and webcasts. We also intend to announce information regarding us and our business, operating results, financial condition and other matters through Tweets on the following Twitter accounts: @dickc, @twitter and @twitterIR.

The information that is tweeted by the foregoing Twitter accounts could be deemed to be material information. As such, we encourage investors, the media and others to follow the Twitter accounts listed above and to review the information tweeted by such accounts.

Any updates to the list of Twitter accounts through which we will announce information will be posted on the investor relations page on our website.

That all seems to be in line with the SEC’s guidance on IR use of social media and company websites for disclosure (speaking as a non-lawyer). Twitter has the advantage of starting afresh – investors aren’t accustomed to seeing its news in one particular place or format.

Twitter fin releases

The end of the world? Hardly – but IROs will be watching with interest.

© 2013 Johnson Strategic Communications Inc.

And now, Twitter as a public company

November 7, 2013

TWTR tweet