The intangibles investors like

Conversations with investors often focus on the numbers, but we also need to give thought to the “soft information” – intangibles. The cover story in this week’s Barron’s, “World’s Most Respected Companies,” provides a pretty good tutorial on which qualitative issues gain the respect of institutional investors. Respect doesn’t always mean a buy decision, but it opens doors.

The direct point of the article is a ranking: Berkshire Hathaway is #1 in a survey comparing institutional investors’ esteem for the world’s 100 largest companies, Walt Disney #2, Apple #3 (down from #1 last year), Google #4 and Coca-Cola #5. No surprises there.

More interesting to me are the comments institutional investors make about intangibles they consider important. The top three qualities that inspire respect, according to the Barron’s investor group, are sound strategy, strong management and ethical practices:

Barrons respect

Those three are followed by other qualities like innovation, competitive edge and growth. In this survey “the numbers” are secondary: Growth in revenue and profit is key for just 5%, strong balance sheet for 1%.

A few of the institutional investors’ comments:

[On Berkshire] “It’s a well-conceived business model, owning good basic businesses, bought at good prices, and managed by great people. A company much to be respected.” …

Does the firm have a defensible long-term business model, and is it built to innovate, compete, and grow? And how good is management, particularly when it comes to capital allocation? …

[On JPMorgan, #45, best of the disrespected megabanks] “How many CEOs would have come out front and center and said, ‘This is my fault?’ … If he weren’t at the helm, you have to think long and hard whether you want to be in this stock …”

“There is value in investing in companies with high integrity. The likelihood is that they won’t do bad things, very bad things, that will affect their stock prices.”

For the investor relations professional, the question is: Are we communicating these intangibles to our investor audiences?

We ought to be thinking about the intangible value-creating qualities as we approach second-quarter earnings (or any season). The message isn’t just this period’s earnings. It is the strategy guiding the company’s business for the coming years, the leadership team’s experience and performance, and whether investors can trust management to deliver on promises.

What’s your opinion?

© 2013 Johnson Strategic Communications Inc.

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