Annual report in two pieces

As an investor relations person, I love this time of year. I enjoy working on clients’ year-end reporting, of course – but it’s also a time when I get to experience IR from the other side, as a member of the audience.

Believe me when I say I am a small shareholder of a few companies (not of any clients, by the way – a separate issue). But when the mail brings an annual report, proxy statement and voting materials, I love it! I dive into those reports, to review companies’ performance and see what they’ve done in the way of presentation. And I vote my proxies, as a believer in letting management know where I stand.

Let me share an example: the annual report in two pieces.

One of my reports came from Shore Bancshares, Inc., a smallish bank holding company based in Maryland and listed on Nasdaq. What made it different was the two pieces: a front section with shareholder letter, financial highlights and marketing stuff like bank locations, and a black & white 10-K. (Results were uninspiring – not the point here.)

Not dramatic or unique … but offering two pieces strikes me as a good solution.

The Shore “marketing” annual report, 8 bound pages all on cover stock, has one page of financial highlights and graphs, a 2-page shareholder letter, a page of locations with maps of the market, board and officer lists and an large photo of the board arranged around antique furniture, and contact info for the banks and insurance offices. The cover says Presence. Stability. Strength. Knowledge. Well, OK.

The 10-K, of course, provides data on competitive position in each of the markets, six and a half pages on risks, revenue and expense breakouts, detail on the assets and issues in the loan portfolio, and so on. It’s red meat for the shareholders.

The marketing version is perfect for a coffee table in a bank branch, another accessory to make customers feel comfortable banking there. The 10-K is not so reassuring for the lay person but useful for investors deciding to buy, hold or sell.

Banks are classic examples of companies whose annual reports have at least two audiences: shareholders or potential investors on the one hand, and customers on the other. Bank customers may see the annual report as an assurance of security for their money, though we might hope the FDIC provides even more solid backing.

The other day I walked into my own bank, in Kansas City, and there was a stack of glossy new 2010 annual reports. I picked one up, of course. But this one, a front section and 10-K bound together, ran 160 pages – really overkill for my needs as a depositor. As a bank customer, if I see assets are substantial and the bank has earnings – and maybe a photo assures me the officers or board members are not motorcycle gang members – I’m OK with leaving my money in that bank.

An investor needs the details. So here’s an idea: If your annual report is serving two different audiences, one approach is to print it in two pieces – send both to shareholders, and give the summary version to customers, vendors and employees.

© 2011 Johnson Strategic Communications Inc.

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