Oh, good (for now anyway)

One regulatory reform proposal has slowed down a bit, at least for now: The Securities and Exchange Commission doesn’t plan to vote until early 2010 on a “proxy access” rule, which would help shareholder activists nominate slates for corporate boards, The Wall Street Journal reports today.

Delay of an SEC vote from autumn to January or February means companies wouldn’t have to contend with direct proxy access in the spring 2010 proxy season, the WSJ notes. That would offer a breather for corporate staffs – and maybe some embattled corporate boards – amid a wave of potential new regulation.

Proposed in May, the SEC proxy access rule (if passed) would give shareholders a “right” to have their board nominees listed in a company’s proxy materials -empowering dissidents who might otherwise be shut out. To qualify for submitting board candidates, shareholders would need to hold a minimum of 1% of the shares for larger firms; 3% for mid-sized companies; and 5% for small firms.

SEC Chairman Mary Schapiro favors the proposal, citing the financial crisis as evidence that boards need more accountability.

Business groups like the National Investor Relations Institute oppose the idea. President & CEO Jeff Morgan said in NIRI’s comment letter to the SEC:

Possible side effects of a federal proxy access rule include increased costs to public companies to ensure valid nominations are included on the proxy, an increased influence of activists with narrow economic interests that run counter to that of long-term shareholders, a continued reduction of individual investors’ proxy voting influence and the possibility for decreased board effectiveness.

Morgan favors company-initiated changes in the proxy process, tailored to the varied interests and circumstances of individual companies. (See Morgan’s comments on a range of regulatory issues in his President’s Blog at the NIRI website, or a quick summary in this IR Café post. Broc Romanek gives an overview of comment letters on proxy access in a post at TheCorporateCounsel.net.)

“Proxy access” hasn’t gone away – just slipped a notch in the Washington timetable.

My own opinion: Handing more power to hedge funds, social activists or union pension funds isn’t really a good “fix” for corporate blunders or misdeeds. Activists follow their own political or economic agendas – not necessarily in the best interest of shareholders. Companies that destroy shareholder value, in my opinion, are punished in the market. And their CEOs and boards often share in the downfall.

What’s your opinion? And have you or your top management spoken out?

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